A really tough question to answer!

A satellite is a machine designed to orbit the Earth or another celestial body, often used for communication, navigation, remote sensing, and scientific research. The weight of a satellite can vary greatly depending on its intended purpose and design.

The average weight of a satellite depends on various factors such as its size, power requirements, propulsion system, and mission objectives. In general, smaller satellites used for communication, remote sensing, or scientific research can weigh anywhere from a few pounds to a few hundred pounds. These satellites are typically classified as microsatellites or nanosatellites, and are often referred to as CubeSats.

CubeSats are small satellites that have become increasingly popular in recent years due to their low cost and versatility. They typically weigh between 1 kg and 10 kg, and can be used for a variety of applications, including Earth observation, communication, and technology demonstration. In contrast, larger satellites used for broadcasting or military purposes can weigh several thousand pounds.

The weight of a satellite is determined by its mass, which is a measure of the amount of matter contained within the object. Mass is typically measured in kilograms (kg) or pounds (lb), and is related to weight through the force of gravity. Weight is a measure of the force exerted on an object due to gravity, and is typically measured in newtons (N) or pounds-force (lbf).

The launch vehicle used to transport the satellite into orbit also plays a significant role in determining the weight of the satellite. Launch vehicles, such as rockets or space shuttles, are designed to carry a certain amount of payload, which includes the weight of the satellite as well as any other equipment or materials needed for the mission. The heavier the satellite, the more powerful the launch vehicle needs to be in order to lift it into orbit.

In addition to the weight of the satellite itself, the weight of the fuel needed for propulsion is also a significant factor. Satellites typically use either chemical or electric propulsion systems to maneuver in orbit, and the amount of fuel needed for these systems can add significantly to the weight of the satellite.

One example of a heavy satellite is the Hubble Space Telescope, which weighs approximately 11,110 kg (24,500 lb). This large telescope is used for astronomical research and was launched in 1990 aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. Another heavy satellite is the International Space Station (ISS), which has a mass of approximately 419,725 kg (925,335 lb). The ISS is a large, habitable structure that is used for scientific research and is maintained by a rotating crew of astronauts.

In contrast, smaller satellites such as CubeSats are typically much lighter, with weights ranging from a few hundred grams to a few kilograms. CubeSats are designed to be inexpensive and easy to manufacture, making them ideal for small-scale research projects and technology demonstrations.

One important consideration when designing a satellite is the power requirements needed to operate the various systems onboard. Satellites typically use solar panels to generate electricity, which can be stored in batteries for use when the satellite is in shadow. The size and weight of the solar panels and batteries needed to meet the power requirements of the satellite can have a significant impact on the overall weight of the satellite.

In addition to power requirements, the mission objectives of the satellite also play a role in determining its weight. For example, a satellite designed for Earth observation may need to carry a large camera or other sensor, which can add significantly to its weight. Satellites used for communication or navigation may require a large antenna or other equipment, which can also contribute to the weight of the satellite.

Overall, the weight of a satellite can vary greatly depending on its intended purpose and design. Smaller satellites such as CubeSats can weigh just a few kilograms, while larger satellites used for broadcasting or scientific research can weigh several thousand pounds. The weight of a satellite is determined by various factors such as its mass, launch vehicle, propulsion system, power requirements, and mission objectives.

The average weight of a satellite can also vary depending on the type of orbit it is intended to operate in. Satellites can be placed in a variety of orbits, including low Earth orbit (LEO), medium Earth orbit (MEO), and geostationary orbit (GEO). Satellites in LEO typically weigh less than those in MEO or GEO, as they require less fuel to maintain their orbit.

In recent years, the use of small satellites has become increasingly popular due to their low cost and versatility. These small satellites, such as CubeSats, typically weigh between 1 kg and 10 kg, and can be used for a variety of applications, including Earth observation, communication, and technology demonstration. The use of small satellites has opened up new opportunities for research and development in space, allowing for more frequent and affordable access to space.

In conclusion, the average weight of a satellite can vary greatly depending on its intended purpose and design. Factors such as mass, launch vehicle, propulsion system, power requirements, and mission objectives all play a role in determining the weight of a satellite. Smaller satellites such as CubeSats have become increasingly popular due to their low cost and versatility, while larger satellites used for broadcasting or military purposes can weigh several thousand pounds. Overall, the weight of a satellite is an important consideration when designing a mission, as it can have a significant impact on the cost and feasibility of the mission.

Here is a list of 100 satellites and their weights:

  1. Vanguard 1 – 1.5 kg
  2. Sputnik 1 – 83.6 kg
  3. Explorer 1 – 13.37 kg
  4. Telstar 1 – 77 kg
  5. Syncom 1 – 68 kg
  6. Transit 2A – 50 kg
  7. Intelsat 1 – 68 kg
  8. Nimbus 1 – 43.5 kg
  9. ATS-1 – 370 kg
  10. Tiros 1 – 122 kg
  11. Molniya 1 – 1,360 kg
  12. LES 1 – 29 kg
  13. OAO 1 – 182 kg
  14. ATS 3 – 370 kg
  15. TDRS 1 – 1,815 kg
  16. Marisat 1 – 324 kg
  17. GOES 1 – 272 kg
  18. COS-B – 670 kg
  19. Landsat 1 – 914 kg
  20. Ekran 1 – 1,300 kg
  21. Viking 1 – 2,328 kg
  22. Viking 2 – 2,328 kg
  23. Skynet 1A – 335 kg
  24. Molniya 2 – 1,270 kg
  25. Gorizont 1 – 1,335 kg
  26. Intelsat 4 – 1,180 kg
  27. ATS-6 – 1,179 kg
  28. SIRIO – 990 kg
  29. Symphonie 1 – 725 kg
  30. Pioneer Venus 1 – 636 kg
  31. Viking Orbiter 1 – 880 kg
  32. Viking Orbiter 2 – 880 kg
  33. TDRS 2 – 1,815 kg
  34. Intelsat 5 – 1,140 kg
  35. ERS-1 – 2,360 kg
  36. Geotail – 2,050 kg
  37. Hubble Space Telescope – 11,110 kg
  38. Intelsat 6 – 1,380 kg
  39. Mars Observer – 1,018 kg
  40. Ulysses – 370 kg
  41. Inmarsat-2 F1 – 689 kg
  42. ERS-2 – 2,400 kg
  43. Space Shuttle Endeavour – 78,000 kg (includes payload)
  44. Space Shuttle Discovery – 78,000 kg (includes payload)
  45. Space Shuttle Atlantis – 78,000 kg (includes payload)
  46. Space Shuttle Columbia – 78,000 kg (includes payload)
  47. Chandra X-Ray Observatory – 5,850 kg
  48. Aqua – 3,200 kg
  49. Jason 1 – 550 kg
  50. Genesis – 671 kg
  51. Huygens Probe – 318 kg
  52. Rosetta – 3,000 kg
  53. Mars Odyssey – 712 kg
  54. Deep Impact – 1,192 kg
  55. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) – 487 kg
  56. Swift – 1,500 kg
  57. THEMIS – 126 kg
  58. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter – 1,950 kg
  59. Solar Dynamics Observatory – 3,040 kg
  60. STEREO – 619 kg
  61. Akatsuki – 517 kg
  62. Juno – 3,625 kg
  63. MAVEN – 2,454 kg
  64. Mars Orbiter Mission – 1,337 kg
  65. Gaia – 2,034 kg
  66. Herschel Space Observatory – 3,290 kg
  67. Planck – 1,907 kg
  68. Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) – 2,454 kg
  69. Sentinel-1A – 2,300 kg
  70. Sentinel-2A – 1,140 kg
  71. Sentinel-3A – 1,250 kg
  72. Sentinel-5P – 820 kg
  73. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich – 1,192 kg
  74. James Webb Space Telescope – 6,500 kg
  75. TerraSAR-X – 1,215 kg
  76. TanDEM-X – 1,340 kg
  77. Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) – 970 kg
  78. ICESat-2 – 1,387 kg
  79. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) – 4,223 kg
  80. SMOS – 658 kg
  81. Planetary Society LightSail 2 – 5 kg
  82. Solar Orbiter – 1,800 kg
  83. Sentinel-3B – 1,245 kg
  84. Sentinel-5 – 900 kg
  85. Parker Solar Probe – 685 kg
  86. BepiColombo – 4,100 kg
  87. InSight – 360 kg
  88. Chang’e 4 – 1,200 kg
  89. Beresheet – 585 kg
  90. Chandrayaan-2 – 3,877 kg
  91. Hayabusa2 – 609 kg
  92. Queqiao – 425 kg
  93. TESS – 362 kg
  94. SpaceIL Genesis – 600 kg
  95. CAPSTONE – 12 kg
  96. Artemis-1 – 26,000 kg (includes rocket)
  97. Sentinel-6B – 1,192 kg
  98. NROL-108 – Unknown
  99. SXM-7 – 7,000 kg
  100. Starlink – 260 kg (per satellite)