Grocery shopping is a necessary and recurring expense for households in the UK. With a variety of supermarkets, local stores, and online options, it can be difficult to know how much to budget for groceries each week. In this blog post, we’ll explore the average amount of money spent on groceries per week in the UK, factors that influence grocery spending, and tips for saving money on groceries.

Average Grocery Spending in the UK

According to a 2021 report by the Office for National Statistics, the average weekly household spend on food and non-alcoholic drinks in the UK was £62.60. This equates to approximately £250 per month on groceries. However, it’s important to note that this is an average, and individual grocery spending can vary significantly depending on factors such as location, family size, dietary requirements, and lifestyle.

For example, families with children tend to spend more on groceries than single-person households. According to a 2020 study by the Food Foundation, households with children under 16 spend an average of £67 per week on food, compared to £43 per week for single-person households. Similarly, households with higher incomes tend to spend more on groceries than those with lower incomes. The same Food Foundation study found that households with an income of over £50,000 per year spend an average of £83 per week on food, compared to £39 per week for those with an income of less than £15,000 per year.

Factors Influencing Grocery Spending

There are several factors that can influence how much a household spends on groceries each week. Here are some of the most common factors:

Location: The cost of groceries can vary significantly depending on where you live in the UK. For example, groceries tend to be more expensive in London and the South East than in other parts of the country.

Family size: As mentioned earlier, households with more members tend to spend more on groceries than single-person households.

Dietary requirements: People with specific dietary requirements, such as vegans or those with food allergies, may need to spend more on groceries to accommodate their needs.

Lifestyle: People with busy lifestyles may opt for convenience foods or ready meals, which tend to be more expensive than cooking from scratch.

Tips for Saving Money on Groceries

If you’re looking to save money on groceries, here are some tips to consider:

  1. Plan your meals: Planning your meals in advance can help you avoid buying unnecessary items and reduce food waste. Try to plan your meals for the week ahead and make a shopping list based on the ingredients you’ll need.
  2. Shop around: Don’t stick to one supermarket or store. Compare prices across different retailers and consider shopping at discount stores or online supermarkets.
  3. Buy in bulk: Buying in bulk can be a cost-effective way to stock up on non-perishable items such as rice, pasta, and canned goods.
  4. Use loyalty schemes: Many supermarkets offer loyalty schemes that reward you for your loyalty with discounts, vouchers, or other perks.
  5. Cook from scratch: Cooking from scratch can be cheaper than buying pre-packaged or ready meals. Try to incorporate more homemade meals into your weekly routine.
  6. Freeze leftovers: If you have leftovers from a meal, freeze them for later. This can help you avoid waste and save money on future meals.
  7. Use coupons and vouchers: Look out for coupons and vouchers in newspapers, magazines, and online. They can offer significant discounts on groceries and other household items.

Conclusion

Grocery shopping is an essential part of daily life, and the amount of money you spend on groceries each week can vary depending on your individual circumstances. The average weekly spend on food and non-alcoholic drinks in the UK is £62.60, but this can vary significantly depending on factors