During the late 1800s and early 1900s, cowboys were integral to the development of the American West. They were responsible for herding and driving cattle, and they often worked in harsh and dangerous conditions. The average life expectancy of a cowboy during this time period is difficult to determine, as it would depend on many factors such as location, lifestyle, occupation, and access to medical care.

Cowboys often worked long and arduous hours, enduring harsh weather conditions and rough terrain. They were also at risk of injury or death from stampedes, falls from horses, and attacks from predators such as wolves and bears. Additionally, they often had limited access to medical care, which could lead to complications from injuries or illnesses.

Despite these challenges, there is evidence to suggest that cowboys during this time period had a higher life expectancy than many other occupations. This is because their lifestyle often included plenty of physical activity and a diet that was high in protein and low in processed foods. Additionally, many cowboys were skilled in first aid and had a good understanding of natural remedies for common ailments.

One study conducted by the University of California, Berkeley, analyzed the mortality rates of cowboys in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The study found that the average age of death for cowboys was around 46 years old, which was higher than the average age of death for many other occupations at the time.

However, it is important to note that this study only included cowboys who were employed by large ranches or cattle companies. It did not include independent cowboys who worked on their own, who may have had different mortality rates due to factors such as access to medical care and social support.

Additionally, life expectancy during this time period varied greatly depending on location. Cowboys who worked in the southern states, where malaria and yellow fever were prevalent, may have had lower life expectancies due to the prevalence of these diseases. Meanwhile, cowboys who worked in the western states, where there was more open land and fewer people, may have had higher life expectancies due to the lower risk of infectious disease and higher access to natural resources.

In conclusion, the average life expectancy of a cowboy during the late 1800s and early 1900s is difficult to determine, as it would depend on many factors such as location, lifestyle, occupation, and access to medical care. While studies have suggested that cowboys had a higher life expectancy than many other occupations at the time, these studies are limited in scope and do not take into account independent cowboys or regional variations in life expectancy. Regardless of their life expectancy, however, cowboys played an important role in the development of the American West, and their legacy continues to be celebrated today.