It is difficult to provide an exact list of the average life expectancy over the last 1000 years in the UK, as life expectancy data from that time period is scarce and often unreliable. However, here is a general overview of how life expectancy has changed over the last 1000 years in the UK:

  1. Medieval period (1000-1500): The average life expectancy during this time period was low, with most people not living past their 30s or 40s. This was due to a combination of factors, including poor living conditions, lack of medical knowledge, and frequent outbreaks of infectious diseases.

  2. Early modern period (1500-1800): Life expectancy began to improve slightly during this time period, thanks to advances in medicine and public health. However, most people still did not live past their 40s or 50s.

  3. Industrial revolution (1800-1900): Life expectancy saw a significant increase during the industrial revolution, due to improvements in sanitation, nutrition, and medical care. By the end of the 19th century, the average life expectancy had risen to around 50-55 years.

  4. 20th century (1900-2000): Life expectancy continued to increase throughout the 20th century, due to further advances in medicine and public health. By the end of the century, the average life expectancy had risen to around 75-80 years.

  5. 21st century (2000-present): Life expectancy has continued to increase in the UK, but at a slower rate than in previous decades. The average life expectancy in the UK today is around 81 years for women and 76 years for men.

It is important to note that these are general trends and that life expectancy can vary depending on factors such as gender, socioeconomic status, and location. Additionally, life expectancy data from earlier time periods is often incomplete or unreliable, so these estimates should be taken with some caution.