The average lifespan of a mouse can vary depending on the species and a number of other factors such as environment, genetics, and diet. However, on average, mice tend to live for around two years.

Mice are small rodents that are found in a wide variety of environments, including urban areas, forests, and agricultural fields. They are known for their ability to reproduce quickly, with females capable of producing litters of up to a dozen offspring at a time. This, coupled with their relatively short lifespan, means that mice can be a prolific pest species in many areas.

The lifespan of mice is largely determined by genetic factors. Different species of mice have different lifespans, with some living only a few months and others living up to four years in the wild. Domesticated mice, which are commonly kept as pets or used in laboratory settings, can live for up to two and a half years with proper care.

In addition to genetics, a number of other factors can influence the lifespan of mice. One of the most important of these is diet. Mice that are fed a high-quality, nutrient-rich diet are likely to live longer than those that are fed a poor diet. Conversely, mice that are exposed to toxins or pollutants in their environment may have shorter lifespans.

Another important factor in the lifespan of mice is the level of predation and competition in their environment. Mice that are able to avoid predators and compete successfully for resources are more likely to survive and live longer than those that are unable to do so.

Despite their relatively short lifespan, mice are important research animals and have been used extensively in biomedical research. Because they are genetically similar to humans and have many of the same physiological and biochemical processes, they are often used as models for human disease and drug development.

In order to maximize the lifespan of mice in research settings, it is important to provide them with appropriate housing, diet, and veterinary care. This includes ensuring that their cages are kept clean and well-ventilated, providing them with a diet that is nutritionally balanced and appropriate for their age and activity level, and monitoring their health closely for signs of illness or disease.

In conclusion, the average lifespan of a mouse is around two years, although this can vary depending on the species and a number of other factors such as diet, genetics, and environment. Despite their short lifespan, mice are important research animals and have been used extensively in biomedical research due to their genetic similarity to humans. To maximize the lifespan of mice in research settings, it is important to provide them with appropriate housing, diet, and veterinary care.